WDFW approves 7 days of  razor clam digging April 8th-14th. Morning tides Not all beaches are open for every dig, so please check the schedule. More tides coming in April and May. Reminder New Clam license is required!

Razor Clam Tides

WDFW Approved Razor Clam Tides:

Approved dates during morning low tides in April:

Attention: New clam license is required!

  • April 8, Monday, 6:44 a.m.; -0.5 feet; Mocrocks
  • April 9, Tuesday, 7:29 am.; -1.2 feet; Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • April 10, Wednesday, 8:14 a.m.; -1.5 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • April 11, Thursday, 9:00 a.m., -1.4 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • April 12, Friday, 9:48 a.m., -1.1 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • April 13, Saturday, 10:40 a.m., -0.5 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • April 14, Sunday, 11:38 a.m., 0.1 feet; Long Beach, Copalis


Not all beaches are open for every dig, so diggers are encouraged to make sure their intended destination is open before heading out.“

Additional tentative dates in April and May:

Attention: New clam license is required!

  • April 8, Monday, 6:44 a.m.; -0.5 feet; Mocrocks
  • April 9, Tuesday, 7:29 am.; -1.2 feet; Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • April 10, Wednesday, 8:14 a.m.; -1.5 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • April 11, Thursday, 9:00 a.m., -1.4 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • April 12, Friday, 9:48 a.m., -1.1 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • April 13, Saturday, 10:40 a.m., -0.5 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • April 14, Sunday, 11:38 a.m., 0.1 feet; Long Beach, Copalis

Tentative dates during morning (midnight to noon) low tides  April 23-29:

  • April 23, Tuesday, 6:58 a.m.; 0.0 feet; Copalis
  • April 24, Wednesday, 7:30 am.; -0.4 feet; Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • April 25, Thursday, 8:03 a.m.; -0.6 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • April 26, Friday, 8:39 a.m., -0.7 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • April 27, Saturday, 9:19 a.m., -0.7 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • April 28, Sunday, 10:05 a.m., -0.5 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • April 29, Monday, 10:58 a.m., 0.3 feet; Long Beach, Mocrocks

Tentative dates during morning (midnight to noon) low tides May 6-12:

  • May 6, Monday, 5:41 a.m.; -0.7 feet; Mocrocks
  • May 7, Tuesday, 6:28 a.m.; -1.5 feet; Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • May 8, Wednesday, 7:13 a.m.; -2.0 feet; Long Beach, Copalis
  • May 9, Thursday, 7:57 a.m.; -2.1 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • May 10, Friday, 8:41 a.m.; -1.9 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks (Long Beach Razor Clam Festival)
  • May 11, Saturday, 9:27 a.m.; -1.4 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks (Long Beach Razor Clam Festival)
  • May 12, Sunday, 10:16 a.m.; -0.8 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis

WDFW approves seven days of coastal razor clam digs starting April 8; additional tentative digs planned for April and May

OLYMPIA – Razor clam diggers can look forward to more digging opportunities on coastal beaches beginning April 8, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) coastal shellfish managers confirmed today.

“April digs are finally here, and hopefully they come with milder weather and sunnier days,” said Bryce Blumenthal, a WDFW coastal shellfish biologist. “The best low tides in April fall during the middle of this next digging series with weekend tides that should still provide ample harvest opportunity.”

Not all coastal beaches are open for every dig, so diggers are encouraged to make sure their intended destination is open before heading out. Optimal digging occurs between one and two hours before the listed time of low tide.

The following April 8-14 digs will proceed as scheduled, after marine toxin results from the Washington State Department of Health (DOH) showed razor clams are safe to eat.

Confirmed dates during morning (midnight to noon, except until 1 p.m. on April 13-14) low tides:

  • April 8, Monday, 6:44 a.m.; -0.5 feet; Mocrocks
  • April 9, Tuesday, 7:29 am.; -1.2 feet; Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • April 10, Wednesday, 8:14 a.m.; -1.5 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • April 11, Thursday, 9:00 a.m., -1.4 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • April 12, Friday, 9:48 a.m., -1.1 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • April 13, Saturday, 10:40 a.m., -0.5 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks (digging extended until 1 p.m.)
  • April 14, Sunday, 11:38 a.m., 0.1 feet; Long Beach, Copalis (digging extended until 1 p.m.)

Tentative dates during morning (midnight to noon) low tides:

  • April 23, Tuesday, 6:58 a.m.; 0.0 feet; Copalis
  • April 24, Wednesday, 7:30 am.; -0.4 feet; Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • April 25, Thursday, 8:03 a.m.; -0.6 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • April 26, Friday, 8:39 a.m., -0.7 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • April 27, Saturday, 9:19 a.m., -0.7 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • April 28, Sunday, 10:05 a.m., -0.5 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks
  • April 29, Monday, 10:58 a.m., 0.3 feet; Long Beach, Mocrocks

Tentative dates during morning (midnight to noon) low tides:

  • May 6, Monday, 5:41 a.m.; -0.7 feet; Mocrocks
  • May 7, Tuesday, 6:28 a.m.; -1.5 feet; Long Beach, Mocrocks
  • May 8, Wednesday, 7:13 a.m.; -2.0 feet; Long Beach, Copalis
  • May 9, Thursday, 7:57 a.m.; -2.1 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis
  • May 10, Friday, 8:41 a.m.; -1.9 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks (Long Beach Razor Clam Festival)
  • May 11, Saturday, 9:27 a.m.; -1.4 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks (Long Beach Razor Clam Festival)
  • May 12, Sunday, 10:16 a.m.; -0.8 feet; Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis

The DOH requires test samples for marine toxins, and domoic acid levels must fall under the guideline level before a beach can open for digging. Domoic acid, a natural toxin produced by certain types of marine algae, can be harmful or fatal if consumed in sufficient quantities. Final approval, including the upcoming April and May digs, usually occurs about a week or less – sometimes two to three days – before the start of each digging series. More information about domoic acid, as well as current levels at ocean beaches, can be found on the WDFW’s domoic acid webpage.

As in past years, WDFW is asking beachgoers to avoid disturbing nesting snowy plovers – a small bird with gray wings and a white breast – by staying out of the dunes and posted areas along the southwest coast. Snowy plover nests are nearly invisible, and it is vital to give birds the space to live and thrive during nesting period, especially along the southern end on Twin Harbors – known as Midway Beach – the north end of Long Beach and the area north of Ocean City on Copalis BeachAvoid leaving leftover food or trash – which attracts predators – on the beach and picnic areas, keep pets on a leash, stay out of dunes, and avoid areas which are clearly marked with posted signs. When driving on the beach, please respect the 25 MPH speed limit and enter only at designated access points.

Clam Gun or Shovel

Check this out!

WDFW  wants razor clam fans around the state to weigh in on the perennial question:

Which is better, clam gun or shovel? 

To register support for a favored digging method, clam diggers can post a photo or video, complete with hashtag #TeamClamShovel or #TeamClamGun on any social media before the end of the spring season.

Many ocean beaches are open to motor vehicles, but drivers are required to follow the "rules of the road," said Ayres. “Mocrocks beach only has three points of road access, so we are asking beachgoers to arrive early and exercise good judgment when accessing the beach,” he added. 

"Under state law, all vehicles - and horses - are required to travel along the extreme upper limit of the hard sand," he said. "When in doubt, follow the path marked by multiple tire tracks." Drivers who veer from that path pose a direct threat to fish and wildlife, Ayres said. Motorists who violate Washington state laws on beach driving can face a fine of $150, or much more for killing endangered seabirds, like snowy plovers. 

“We manage recreational clam digging in Washington in a manner that we believe minimizes potential impacts to vulnerable ground nesting listed bird species,” said Ayres. “We do this by not scheduling digging after May 15 at key breeding areas for snowy plovers and streaked horned larks, including Long Beach and Twin Harbors.”

The agency continues to emphasize ‘digging while distancing’ and masking up when near others to support efforts by community health experts to ensure a fun and safe razor clam season.  
 
The agency continues to emphasize ‘digging while distancing’ and masking up when near others to support efforts by community health experts to ensure a fun and safe razor clam season.  

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. 

Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license (starting at $9.70) to an annual combination fishing license, are available on WDFW's website and from some 600 license vendors around the state.  

Under state law, diggers at open beaches can take 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger's clams must be kept in a separate container

Razor Clams

Please remember to check with Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife for last minute changes to the razor clam digging , rules and regulations.

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Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include:

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Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.

Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.

Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor.

Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point.

Kalaloch Beachwhich extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. 

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